CFS Chair’s letter on the situation of Yemen

Rome, 7 January 2019 Excellency, The devastation and terrible suffering caused by the armed conflict in Yemen is a matter of great concern. Conflict, economic collapse, and rising food prices are continuing to push the civilian population into hunger and malnutrition. As Chairperson of the Committee on World Food Security (CFS), the United Nations (UN) platform that strives for a world free from hunger, I cannot remain silent while 20 million Yemenis are food insecure, including 1.8 million acutely malnourished children. Unless urgent action is taken, a whole generation of Yemenis is at risk. I am writing to strongly urge you to take immediate action to keep the international pledge to protect the civilians of Yemen from further devastation, to relieve them from their suffering and to prevent further damage to their livelihoods. The latest report on the State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World shows that hunger and malnutrition are mainly driven by man-made conflicts and the consequences of climate change. The on-going conflict in Yemen is disrupting food systems and livelihoods, while preventing humanitarian assistance from getting through to those in need. As I write, three out of four Yemenis cannot reliably produce or buy food. I wish to join UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Michelle Bachelet, in calling on all those with involvement or influence in the Yemeni conflict to allow and facilitate the rapid and unimpeded passage of food and other humanitarian relief, and to refrain from taking actions that would deprive civilians of their access to life saving food, water, and health care. The Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) is coordinating emergency and relief responses, including the provision of health care to 8 million people in Yemen. Additionally, more than 7 million receive food aid and a similar number is given clean water and sanitation support. I urge all CFS stakeholders, the whole UN System and the international community at large, to do everything they can to coordinate efforts while supporting IASC in mobilizing the necessary resources so that emergency and relief activities can meet the needs of the population of Yemen. In addition to saving lives and meeting immediate needs through emergency humanitarian responses, we need to start planning for longer-term assistance to support recovery, build resilience and promote sustainable socio-economic development in a post- conflict Yemen. CFS has created policy recommendations that can be put to use in this juncture, especially

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HLPE online consultation on the scope of the 2020 Report

Food Security and Nutrition: Building a global narrative towards 2030 HLPE e-consultation on the Report’s scope 3 December 2018 – 7 January 2019 During its 45th Plenary Session (15-20 October 2018), the UN Committee on World Food Security (CFS) requested its High Level Panel of Experts on Food Security and Nutrition (HLPE) to produce a short report (around 20 pages, approximately 20 000 words) entitled “Food Security and Nutrition: Building a global narrative towards 2030” to be presented by the first semester 2020″. Click here to download the CFS request. To implement this CFS request, the HLPE is launching an open e-consultation to seek views and comments on the following scope and building blocks of the report, outlined below. 2020 will be a milestone in the advancement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) with only ten years left before the 2030 deadline. Ten years after the CFS reform, this report aims to take stock of what CFS has done, with the support of the HLPE. It will assess how past CFS policy recommendations have contributed or could contribute to FSN and to the 2030 Agenda. This stocktaking analysis should be framed within the CFS vision and take into account the perspectives of the most affected by food insecurity and malnutrition. Rather than simply summarising previous HLPE reports, the objective of this report is to articulate, for decision-makers and non-expert readers, the main findings of previous HLPE publications (including the two notes on critical and emerging issues)[1] in a global, coherent and comprehensive narrative around FSN and sustainable development, integrating different forms of knowledge. This report will reflect the current state of knowledge as evidenced in previous HLPE publications, as well as the most recent developments of knowledge on FSN related issues. It will build upon the main areas of consensus and controversy, the major challenges and opportunities, the main knowledge gaps or uncertainties, emerging from previous HLPE publications. It will highlight, using concrete examples as appropriate, possible solutions and priorities for action for the world community to advance FSN in its four dimensions (availability, access, utilization and stability) and the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and targets, at different scales, from local to global. This report will examine food systems governance issues at different scales, considering the specific roles and responsibilities of and possible synergies between different actors (public sector, private sector and civil society). Forward looking, this analysis should inform future CFS actions towards the achievement

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CSM Video interventions at CFS 45!

Please find all CSM Plenary Interventions at CFS 45 (15 – 19 October 2018)!     CSM statement at the Global Thematic Event to monitor the Right to Food Guidelines: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nl28gB2gGVc 18 October 2018 Ramona Dominicioiu, La Via Campesina – LVC (Romania) Coordinator of the CSM Working Group on Monitoring We first want to start off by congratulating CFS actors for the amount of participation that went into this monitoring process, and offer a special congratulations to member states for taking up the call to conduct monitoring exercises at sub-national, national, regional, and global levels. Through these exercises, we can better understand the successes and challenges in implementing the right to food guidelines, and reaffirm the importance of ensuring space for monitoring and accountability at the CFS. Continue Reading! CSM Plenary statement at the Global Thematic Event to monitor the Right to Food Guidelines: https://youtu.be/YPyjQt3NpD4 18 October 2018 Billy Mayaya – Right to Food Network (Malawi) CSM Working Group on Monitoring  While there are many different laws, policies, strategies, and constitutional provisions that support the Right to Food at national level- our assessment has revealed that there remains fragmentation across sectors, as well as a gap between frameworks and implementation. And within those gaps falls many different kinds of violations which were already mentioned in the panel presentation, including  the increasing rates of criminalization of human rights defenders- an important issue that we also raised in the 2016 monitoring exercise of the Tenure Guidelines, and unfortunately has not yet changed. Continue reading! CSM Plenary Intervention on the adoption of the ToRs for the upcoming policy convergence process on Nutrition and Food Systems: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BNLh3f0Ndq4 17 October 2018 Isabel Álvarez Vispo – Urgenci (Spain) Coordinator of the CSM Working Group on Nutrition and Food Systems  I would like to thank the Open Ended Working Group (OEWG) and the task teams for the process so far, and for the work carried out to achieve these Terms of Reference.It is worth noting that the process that lies ahead is extremely important, especially in the current context of hunger and malnutrition. This process can show us the path to follow in order to fulfil the CFS mandate. It is the responsibility of the CFS to achieve food security, and to enable access for everyone to healthy food that reflects justice for both people and planet earth. Continue Reading! CSM Plenary intervention during the debate on the State of Food and

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CSM Women’s Vision!

CSM Women’s Vision Document 2018 We women of the CSM constituency, gathering rural and urban, fisher folks, peasants, pastoralists, indigenous, consumers, agricultural workers, NGO activists, landless women from all across the world, met during the CFS High Level Forum on women’s empowerment in the context of food security and nutrition, and developed the structure of our Vision Statement.  This vision has been adopted by the CSM Women Constituency and aims to guide and promote the actions of the CSM within and outside the CFS to achieve the right to food for all women. We believe that the right to food, food security and nutrition and food sovereignty of women will never be achieved without ensuring the full respect, protection and fulfilment of women’s rights. We want to go beyond the universally agreed goal of gender equality and women’s empowerment, which does not explicitly assert the centrality of women’s rights. We also express some concern about the term “empowerment”, which might imply a top-down relation where women are conceived as recipients of external education, training, and interventions. We want to support our self-determination, autonomy and decision-making power in all the aspects of our lives, including the food we produce and consume. We recognize the need to deconstruct the dominant narrative on women who are very often portrayed as victims in need of anti-poverty policies and social assistance, and treated as objects in the food advertising and marketing industry. All actors engaged in the CFS must internalize in their analysis, contributions and practical actions the fact that women are active political subjects, agents of their own change and development, and must be recognized as having the right to self-determine themselves and their bodies. Women are knowledge bearers and have capacities, we require public policies that are gender-oriented or specific for women, with adequate budgets to guarantee their effective implementation. They should be primarily directed to women’s organizations, promoting self-empowerment, self-training and women’s autonomy.  This perspective should inform any discussion leading to CFS policy decisions as these can be conducive to change or perpetuate the violence against women by hierarchical and discriminatory power that is historically and socially constructed, and normalized. We believe that the current global food system builds on and perpetuates gender based discrimination and the violation of women’s rights. In order to achieve a fair and equal society where women can fully enjoy their rights, we must put at the

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CSM Final Statement at CFS 45

CSM Final Statement at CFS 45   https://youtu.be/ynQn1MFFqrA 19 October 2018 Antonio González – (MAELA), Guatemala The CSM would like to thank everyone – the Chair, member states, participants, the Secretariat and all other who have contributed to a productive week here at CFS 45, including the interpreters, the messengers, the technicians, the cleaners, and the meeting services team. This year the CFS has made some strides – but more work is needed to focus our discussion and ensure CFS policies result in action on the ground. We welcome the adoption of the implementation plan as a comprehensive response to the independent evaluation of the CFS.  It provides us with the key elements, strategic guidance and the operational tools for the next years.  We call on all members and participants of the CFS to engage constructively on the three adopted strategic objectives in support of the realization of the CFS vision.  We have clear guidance on how to move forward and now we must deliver – it is time to recommit. Inclusiveness must be a daily practice at the CFS.  We at the CSM have taken the important step this year to change our name to better recognize the struggle of Indigenous Peoples all over the globe for their territories, natural resources, and identities. We are proud to be the Civil Society and Indigenous Peoples’ Mechanism.  We are also encouraged by the commitment in this room to ensuring that women’s rights, women’s empowerment and gender equality are a central pillar to the CFS’s work.  We will continue to work with all actors to both mainstream and focus on women’s rights. We must also make sure that other marginalized peoples like refugees, undocumented peoples, and migrant workers, be more strongly heard in this forum. The successful Global Thematic Event from yesterday and the huge commitment of CFS actors to the process of monitoring the right to food guidelines, made evident the importance of monitoring here at the CFS and that the right to food guidelines are being used around the world to better to ensure that no one is left behind.  The right to food is fundamental to achieving – food security, women’s rights, poverty eradication, sustainable livelihoods, peace and security, economic growth, and the 2030 agenda.  We must build on our collective work this year to monitor implementation and share experiences as well as to collectively strengthen our efforts to put the

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“Agricultural workers have to organize themselves and claim their rights”, Patrick Konde

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2VdYpWSfsEM&feature=youtu.be In this video Patrick Konde, trade union leader, talks about the organization of immigrant agricultural workers and other sectors in Italy to assert their rights for the improvement of their living conditions. Patrick participated as a speaker at the side event on the link between migration and the right to food, organized by the CSM, in the context of the events of the UN Committee on World Food Security (CFS).

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Migration and the Right to Food: “Women workers are the most exploited and least paid in Italy”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1RyHjzohBE&feature=youtu.be In this video, Rossana Scaricabarozzi, of ActionAid Italy, talks about the results of a study carried out recently about the condition of migrant agricultural workers, particularly women. The study shows that women are among the most exploited and least paid migrant agricultural workers in Italy. Despite the escalating numbers of migrant women entering the sector, there is a huge invisibility of their work and their difficulties.

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A Mechanism of Civil Society and Indigenous Peoples

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U7PmlaqObL4&feature=youtu.be The MSC officially adopted the name of the Civil Society and Indigenous Peoples Mechanism for relations with the Committee on World Food Security. Participants representing indigenous peoples in the Civil Society Forum (13-14, October) and the sessions of the Committee on Food Security (15-19) speak in this video of the process and express their joy for the incorporation of “Indigenous Peoples” “In the name of the mechanism.

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CSM Opening Statement at CFS 45

https://youtu.be/jLFos-jP3QY   Intervention for the opening of the 45thCFS Plenary Session – 15 October 2018 Iridiani Seibert – La Via Campesina (Brazil) Co-coordinator of the Women’s Constituency of the MSC We salute the CFS member states, participating institutions and observers. We hope that this 45th session will be marked by a renewed commitment to the CFS, to strengthen the Committee and its contribution to overcoming the alarming situation of hunger and malnutrition in the world we face today. First of all, it is with great pleasure that we inform you today that our Civil Society Mechanism has been strengthened by the inclusion of Indigenous Peoples in its own name. After a year of consultation, the CSM Coordination Committee has decided by consensus, and the CSM Forum has celebrated this decision, that from now on we will be called “Civil Society and Indigenous Peoples’ Mechanism for relations with the Committee on Food Security”. With this name amendment, we reaffirm our recognition of the identity of indigenous peoples and express our full solidarity with their historical struggles to be recognized in their identity and their right to self-determination as indigenous peoples. We are extremely concerned because we see that we are on the wrong track towards achieving the goal of ending hunger, established by the SDGs. Today, 821 million women, men, boys and girls suffer from hunger and food and nutritional insecurity. 821 million people in all regions of the world go to bed every day without having eaten. The SOFI 2018 Report again calls our attention and imposes concrete actions and commitments on us once and for all. Hunger and food insecurity are the most important problems we face in the world today. It is a human rights issue. The most important response to the alarming figures presented by SOFI 2018 is that the international community must commit itself more than ever to the respect, protection and guarantee of the human right to adequate food. Today, on the tenth anniversary of World Rural Women’s Day, the condition in which we rural women find ourselves does not allow us to celebrate. Sixty per cent of the 821 million people suffering from hunger are women and girls. On this anniversary, we want to reiterate the need for the commitment of States to promote actions and policies to overcome these data, as they have expressed in SDG 5 which consists of: “the construction of

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