HLPE e-consultation on the zero draft of the report on Multistakeholder partnerships

HLPE Report on: Multistakeholder Partnerships to Finance and Improve Food Security and Nutrition in the Framework of the 2030 Agenda From 16 January to 19 February 2018 During its 43rd Plenary Session (17-21 October 2016), the CFS requested the HLPE to produce a report on “Multistakeholder Partnerships to Finance and Improve Food Security and Nutrition in the Framework of the 2030 Agenda” to be presented at CFS45 Plenary session in October 2018. As part of its report elaboration process, the HLPE is now launching an e-consultation to seek inputs, suggestions, and comments on the present V0 Draft. This open e-consultation will be used by the HLPE to further elaborate the report, which will then be submitted to external expert review, before finalization and approval by the HLPE Steering Committee.  Please download the Draft V0 of the Report here: http://www.fao.org/fileadmin/user_upload/hlpe/hlpe_documents/PT_MultiStakeholders/Docs/HLPE-Multi-Stakeholder-Partnerships-for-FSN_Draft-V0-16_January_2018.pdf   HLPE V0 drafts are deliberately presented early enough in the process – as a work-in-progress, with their range of imperfections – to allow sufficient time to give proper consideration to the feedback received so that it can play a really useful role in the elaboration of the report. It is a key part of the scientific dialogue between the HLPE Project Team and Steering Committee, and the rest of the knowledge community. In order to enrich and illustrate the report with a variety of examples, participants are invited to submit concrete, practical, well-documented and significant case-studies of existing MSPs, as defined in the V0 Draft, through the use of the dedicated Questionnaire provided both as an annex to the V0 Draft, and as a separate editable word file. The HLPE also encourages the submission of further material, references and evidence on the performance and impact of existing MSPs in the field of FSN. In order to strengthen the report, the HLPE welcomes all the suggestions, including contributions regarding the following questions: The purpose of the report is to analyze the role of MSPs in improving and financing FSN. Do you think that this draft is striking the right balance and give enough space to finance related issues? What are the constraints to raising funds for FSN? Is the structure of the report comprehensive enough, and adequately articulated? Are the concepts clearly defined and used consistently throughout the report? Are there important aspects that are missing? Are there any major omissions or gaps in the report? Are there topics under-or over-represented in relation to their importance? Are any facts or

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The Right to Adequate Food Event 24 January 2017

The Permanent Representation of Norway to the UN organisations in Rome and the Civil Society Mechanism for relations with the UN Committee on World Food Security (CSM), in collaboration with the Permanent Representations of Brazil, Switzerland and South Africa kindly invite you to the event The Right to Adequate Food  Promoting accountability of food security actions to the people most affected by food insecurity and malnutrition  24 January 2017  German Room, FAO HQs  9.30 – 13.00 The event will address the following questions: What is the Role of the Right to Adequate food in CFS, 20 years after the World Food Summit? Why is accountability to affected populations important for the Right to Adequate Food of the people most affected by food insecurity and malnutrition, and how does it operate in practice? Why is the right to adequate food and accountability to affected populations important on the country level? The event is open to all members, participants and observers of the CFS, and staff members of the Rome-based Agencies The event will be held in English A light breakfast will be served at 9.00 Download the Flyer! Download the Concept Note   The meeting will be webstreamed at this link: http://www.fao.org/webcast/home/en/item/4291/icode/   Read the CSO Report on the event Agenda   9.30 – 9.45 What is the Role of the Right to Adequate Food in the CFS, 20 years after the WFS and 50 Years after the adoption of the ICESCR and ICCPR? Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (video message) HE Ambassador Amira Gornass, Chair of the UN Committee on World Food Security, Permanent Representative of Sudan to the UN agencies in Rome HE Ambassador Inge Nordang, Permanent Representative of Norway 9.45 – 10.45 Why are human rights, particularly the right to adequate food, essential for the fight against hunger and malnutrition, and how has this approach contributed to food security and nutrition?            Keynote Speaker: Olivier De Schutter, Member of the UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights Hilal Elver, UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food (video message)              Conversation with: Joseph Schechla, Coordinator, Habitat International Coalition Martial Jeugue, Expert Member of the ACHPR’s WG on ECOSOC Rights, African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights Naseegh Jaffer, General Secretary, World Forum of Fisher Peoples, Member of the Coordination Committee of the CSM Discussion with the floor Moderator: Sofia Monsalve, Secretary General, FIAN

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Share your experiences on the Right to Food!

Background In 2014, on the 10 year anniversary of the adoption of the Voluntary Guidelines to support the progressive realization of the right to adequate food in the context of national food security (hereinafter Right to Food Guidelines), CSOs and social movements issued a report to take stock of national implementation of the right to food and, more importantly, to call for renewed commitment by governments, UN agencies, civil society and other stakeholders, for the full realization of the right to adequate food and nutrition. However, rather than renewed commitments, since 2014 we have witnessed regression in human rights commitments across international, regional and national levels, and a failure of governments to fully address issues of accountability. The right to food is the right of people to feed themselves, their families and their communities in dignity, today and in the future. The right to food requires laws and policies that support this and improve peoples’ ability to meet their food needs, to grow food and to make a living sustainably. Holding governments accountable to their legal human rights obligations, as well as ensuring that the commitments made and negotiated in international policy fora are implemented, has been a consistent challenge for CSOs. However, we have a new opportunity to raise our voices about right to food realization and to hold our governments accountable. With the development of the CFS monitoring mechanism, major policy instruments will be reviewed at the CFS on a biennial basis. In 2016 the Tenure Guidelines were reviewed, and CSOs provided an independent CSO report to contribute to the process. After some difficult negotiations, it has been agreed that the Right to Food Guidelines will be monitored, with results presented during the 45th session of the CFS in October 2018. As part of this process, the Civil Society Mechanism (CSM) for the CFS will coordinate its own independent process and report. The objectives of this exercise include: Document progress on actual implementation of the Right to Food, looking beyond the existence of laws and policy frameworks; Make visible the policies and practices of governments, third parties and international organizations which give rise to violations, or prevent the realization of the Right to Food; Create an updated normative framework of the Right to Food, which has developed from and since the Right to Food Guidelines. We need your help! In order to put forward a full picture of

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Good bye Kuria. We will always remember your smile and warm heart.

It is with great sadness that we announce the loss of our dear Kuria Gathuru on 15 of November 2017. We would like to express our deep condolences to Kuria’s family over his loss. He was also our dear friend and comrade in the CSM. Over the past three years, Kuria has been an integral part of our family in the CSM, serving as a co-facilitator of the global constituency of the Urban Food Insecure to the CSM Coordination Committee and Co -Coordinator of the Urbanisation and Rural Transformation Working Group . We always deeply appreciated Kuria and his way of being with all of us, enriching our space and work with his wonderful personality, knowledge and commitment. We are very grateful for the time and wisdom he dedicated to support the struggle for the right to food and food sovereignty, and bringing in a perspective and expertise that were so special and at the heart of the work we do. His knowledge and experiences in Nairobi, which he brought to our work together in Rome, was always valuable, and many of the colleagues of the CSM Coordination Committee expressed that Kuria’s kindness, patience and understanding with everyone, and his openness to ideas and people was something very special. He was a true struggler whom we all loved and appreciated. He was a person with incredible passion for what he did and the people he worked with every day, and particularly the young people that he worked with and mentored. We will always remember his kind smile, his unique laugh, and his warm heart. In the name of the whole Coordination Committee and colleagues in the CSM.

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Extension of deadline to 1st December! HLPE Electronic Consultation on the scope of the Report: Agroecological approaches and other innovations

Extension of deadline to 1st December!  HLPE Electronic Consultation on the scope of the Report: Agroecological approaches and other innovations for sustainable agriculture and food systems that enhance food security and nutrition During its 44th Plenary Session (9-13 October 2017), the CFS requested the HLPE to produce a report on “Agroecological approaches and other innovations for sustainable agriculture and food systems that enhance food security and nutrition”, to be presented at CFS46 Plenary session in October 2019. As part of its report elaboration process, the HLPE is launching an e-consultation to seek views and comments on the following scope and building blocks of the report, outlined below, as proposed by the HLPE Steering Committee. Please note that in parallel to this scoping consultation, the HLPE is calling for interested experts to candidate to the Project Team for this report. The Project Team will be selected by the end of 2017 and will work until June 2019. The call for candidature is open until 15 November 2017; visit the HLPE website www.fao.org/cfs/cfs-hlpe for more details Proposed draft Scope of the HLPE Report by the HLPE Steering Committee Innovation has been a major engine for agriculture transformation in the past decades and will be pivotal to address the needs of a rapidly growing population and the increased pressure over natural resources (including biodiversity, land and water) in a context of climate change. Agroecology and other innovative approaches, practices and technologies can play a critical role to strengthen sustainable agriculture and food systems in order to successfully combat hunger, malnutrition and poverty and contribute to the advancement of the 2030 Agenda. Building sustainable agriculture and food systems that enhance food security and nutrition (FSN) will require not only to develop new knowledge and technologies but also: to fill the technology gaps; to facilitate the effective access and use of existing technologies; and to develop context-specific solutions, adapted to local food systems and local ecosystems. Beyond technical issues, this report will assess the importance of bottom-up and people-centered approaches, building on different forms of knowledge, as well as the role of good governance and strong institutions. It will explore the enabling conditions needed to foster scientific, technical, financial, political and institutional innovations for enhanced FSN. Agroecology, described simultaneously as a science, a set of practices and a social movement, will be studied in this report, as an example of such holistic innovative approaches combining science and

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CSM Welcome Kit

CSM Welcome Kit: Useful Tips on the Civil Society Mechanism (CSM) for Relations with the UN Committee on World Food Security (CFS)   Understanding the role and structure of the CFS is no easy task! It results that understanding what the CSM is and does, proves to be quite complex too.   This welcome kit wants to be an accessible tool to start navigating these complex spaces. It can be useful for those who approach the CSM and CFS for the first time, but they can also be a useful set of tips to get back to for more experienced participants.   Please DOWNLOAD THE KIT HERE and share it widely among your constituencies and sub-regions so that the CSM and the CFS may become less abstract spaces for those who carry out the struggle at the local level.   Do you want to know more? Check out the CSM page for a more detailed explanation and download the the power point presentation of the CSM    

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CSM Final Statement @CFS 44 and CFS 44 Final Report!

CSM Final statement @ CFS 44 and CFS 44 Final Report 13 October 2017 Credit Foto @FAO Download the CFS 44 final report Madame Chair, members and participants of the CFS, The CFS is like a milpa, a maizefield: first, we prepare the land, we sow, we care, and afterwards, after a good time, we can harvest. Sometimes there is a good harvest, sometimes the harvest is bad, depending on many factors, the quality of the soil, the weather, the models of production. The harvest very much depends on the people who produce the food and take care of the lands, fisheries and forests. What did we sow this year, what could we harvest at this CFS 44? We would like to highlight some of the most outstanding positive and concerning points. We first want to mention the process and outcome of the CFS Workstream on Women’s empowerment. The Forum, its preparation, the Chair’s summary, the extraordinary key note speech of Helen Hakena and the adopted decision box were a highlight in the CFS year 2017. We celebrate the new common understanding, which clearly and unequivocally recognizes that women’s empowerment, gender equality and women’s rights are strongly interrelated and they constitute a fundamental prerequisite for achieving Food Security and Nutrition. Each of the elements is necessary but cannot be sufficient on its own. Finally, CFS has recognized that the three elements need to move ahead together, and from now on will not step back from this important achievement in its future policy outcomes and processes. The Forestry process was difficult: the rushed pace of the negotiations, the low level of participation and non-inclusive nature of the way the negotiation methodology led to a negotiation process full of tensions. We need to assess and revise this format. However, the outcome of the process is acceptable to us, as it recognizes that peoples and their rights are at the center of the relations between forests and food security and nutrition. It recognizes the diversity of relationships with and views of what forests and forest eco-systems are, and their spiritual, social, cultural, political and economic importance to our constituencies and peoples. We particularly welcome the Plenary agreement that a further discussion on the relation of commercial tree plantations and food security and nutrition will be held. https://youtu.be/FcMevTxudh8   On Nutrition, we defend a holistic vision, which is based on human rights and goes

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CSM Plenary Statements @CFS 44

Credit Photo @FAO 5th Day – 13 October 2017 Critical and Emerging Issues for Food Security and Nutrition Intervention of Elenita Neth Daño, ETC Group, Philippines on behalf of the CSM https://youtu.be/vk9bULHl0kQ Intervention of Thierry Kesteloot, Oxfam Solidarité, Belgium on behalf of the CSM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sMBZ_LHTfYc   4th Day – 12 October 2017 CFS Evaluation Intervention of Ramona Dominicioiu, La Via Campesina, Romania on behalf of the CSM Working Group on CFS Evaluation CSM has contributed intensively to the CFS evaluation elaboration and the discussion on how to best respond to it. We congratulate Ms. Angela Bester and her team for the report, and Egypt and Iceland for their co-facilitation work for the CFS response to it during the past months. The CFS continues to be in a critical situation. We have seen during the past years and also during this session, that there are two possible pathways for the CFS: either it goes in the direction of erosion of the CFS Reform, or in the direction of strengthening the CFS in the spirit of its Reform. The CSM clearly stated its expectation that the evaluation and the discussion on the response to it should be guided by the spirit of the reform and make the CFS much stronger in line with its mandate and its roles. We welcome that the Co-Facilitators concluded the first Meeting on the Response in June this year with the explicit statement that there will be no reform of the reform. The Consultation report clearly points in this direction: it aims to further strengthen the roles and functioning of the CFS in line with its mandate and vision. Keep Reading… https://youtu.be/aWm43IZdoOc Intervention of Alberto Broch, COPROFAM, Brazil on behalf of the CSM Working Group on CFS Evaluation Positions on specific topics of the Evaluation and the Consultation report: We can agree with the Consultation report as presented, although we see many weaknesses in it. The proposal of having a strategic MYPOW is a good compromise which takes into account the fact that the CFS is not an organization, but a platform. The budget issue is not solved in our view, this remains as an urgent challenge to solve next year. We would like to reaffirm that the budget is not a financial but a political issue. On other issues like Plenary, OEWGs, Chair and Secretariat, specific follow-up steps are agreed for next year. The composition of the Advisory Group should reflect

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People’s voices from CSM at CFS 44!

Radio Mundo Real – Friends of the Earth International  Interviews Naseegh Jaffer  WFFP, South Africa, CSM Coordination Committee Member and CSM Coordinator of Monitoring WG   https://vimeo.com/237535088   Radio Mundo Real – Friends of the Earth International  Interviews Antonio Gonzalez, MAELA, Guatemala Member of the CSM Coordination Committee for the sub-region of Central America and the Caribbean https://vimeo.com/241516941   Radio Mundo Real – Friends of the Earth International  Interviews Kirtana Chandrasekaran Friends of the Earth International, UK  Co-Facilitator of the CSM Working Group on Forestry   https://vimeo.com/237628424 Radio Mundo Real – Friends of the Earth International  Interviews Ramona Dominicioiu La Via Campesina, Romania CSM Coordination Committee Member for the Smallholders and Family Farmers Constituency https://vimeo.com/238558151     Radio Mundo Real – Friends of the Earth International  Interviews Saúl Vicente International Indian Treaty Council (IITC), Mexico CSM Coordination Committee Member for the Indigenous Peoples Constituency https://vimeo.com/239017779  

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CSM Opening Statements on Famines and food crisis

  CFS 44, 9 October 2017: – CSM Statement on Policy responses to Food Crises, Famines and their Root Causes, and the Role of CFS As the SOFI Report 2017 states the situation of chronic food crises in many countries and regions has severely worsened this year, with four countries on the brink of famine. This is unacceptable and calls for the collective responsibility of all governments, organizations and peoples. Famines do not happen instantaneously, they take years to develop and early political and humanitarian action is extremely critical for prevention and mitigation. We cannot tackle food crises, and eradicate hunger, without addressing the root causes. Food insecurity derives typically from structural factors and policies that marginalize local food systems and small-scale food producers, and foster increased concentration of corporate power. During conflict, food insecurity is exacerbated. According to the SOFI 2017, around 60 % the world’s hungry live in areas where there is conflict. The current food crises in conflict are largely due to multiple and often systemic human rights violations committed by state and non-state actors. They are rooted in aggression against civilians and food producers, resource dispossession and destruction, systemic disruption of agricultural activities, restriction of movement of peoples, traders and humanitarian assistance, as well as ethnic cleansing, occupation and sanctions. Starvation is used as a weapon of collective punishment and for most cases perpetuators enjoy impunity. Continued depletion of natural resources makes communities extremely vulnerable to natural disasters which are more severe than ever due to human-induced climate change. For those communities that are in dire need of food assistance, the late response to early warning systems, including humanitarian assistance and political and diplomatic pressure, results in worsening of food insecurity, spread of diseases, and human loss. The Humanitarian architecture has proven to be insufficient as assistance is very often politicized and nowhere near enough to meet the needs in the “four famine” countries and elsewhere. CFS was reformed in response to the food crises in 2007/8. It must be able to effectively respond to the food crises of today, and tackle their causes sustainably. CFS should fully take on its role as the most inclusive international body for policy coherence, cooperation and coordination on FSN. In particular: https://youtu.be/hxGWmB6ViFQ First–CFS should become the central global platform for convening periodic and ad-hoc reviews of famines and severe food crises, focusing on the assessment of policy responses and

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