Call for Contributions on Changing Rural-Urban Dynamics!

Call for contributions On February 3rd, 2017 the Open Ended Working Group (OEWG) of the CFS on Urbanization and Rural Transformation (UR&RT) adopted a “CALL FOR EXPERIENCES AND POLICY APPROACHES IN ADDRESSING FOOD SECURITY AND NUTRITION IN THE CONTEXT OF CHANGING RURAL-URBAN DYNAMICS”, which includes the template for submission of case studies in all UN official languages EN, ES, FR, RU, AR, CH. The aim of the CALL is to collect short summaries of experiences and policy approaches addressing food security and nutrition in the context of urbanization and rural transformation with the primary focus on rural-urban linkages. For relevant thematic areas and criteria for selection of the submissions the please refer to this link. Please note that the call does not intend to collect only successful case studies, but rather the experiences, regardless their positive results, as failed policies are food for thought and improvement in the future. The main focus should be on lessons (positive and negative) and on how gaps, obstacles and other adverse conditions (administrative, economic, political etc.) were addressed. The case studies can be submitted in all official UN languages (AR, CH, EN, ES, FR, RU), using this template and should not exceed 1000 words. In addition to using these experiences in the CFS process, as CSM we will use them to also create our own understanding of how we view rural transformation that supports the right to food and nutrition in the context of food sovereignty. Deadline for submissions is March 15, 2017, however as we intend to collect CSO case studies and submit them together in the name of CSM though CSM WG on Urbanization and Rural Transformation, please send your submissions before March 10 to Imogen Ebsworth at Imogen.k@gmail.com Why is it important for the CSM to contribute? The CFS lunched the work stream on urbanization and rural transformation in December 2015 and so far it was focused on the identification of the policy relevant areas for the CFS arising from urbanization and rural transformation. As a second stage the work steam wants to collect case studies reflecting the experiences in this regard. It is expected that based on the analysis of the submitted documents, the CFS will identify key messages to be discussed on the CFS 44 forum. In general the topic of the work stream is very important for the civil society as it covers food security problems related to

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The CSM Annual Report 2015-2016 is now online!

CSM Annual Report 2015-2016 This Annual Report documents the work of the CSM during the period August 2015 to August 2016, and aims to be an essential tool for the internal and external communication and accountability process. The Report 2015-2016 consists of the following parts: • Summary of CSM engagement with the CFS (2015-2016) • A civil society view on the CFS, 7 years after its reform • Reporting and Follow-Up to CFS 42 • Civil Society contributions to CFS Processes in 2016 (towards CFS 43) • Operational information on the CSM during the reporting period In October 2016, the CSM Coordination Committee and the CSM Forum considered the draft Annual Report that was then later revised and is now being published. The report shows the substantial collective work carried out by a huge number of global, regional and national social movements and civil society organizations who achieve, through participatory deliberation processes, to formulate and defend joint positions towards all complex policy processes in the CFS. Read the CSM Annual Report 2015-2016

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CSM Information Meeting 7 February 2017

The Civil Society Mechanism (CSM) to the UN Committee on World Food Security (CFS) would like to kindly invite you to the informational meeting:   Civil Society Priorities for CFS in 2017   7 February 2017, Mexico Room 9:30 to 12:00 pm The objective of this information meeting at the beginning of each year is to present the CSM annual report of the past year and to share with interested CFS members and participants the priorities, workplan and budget of the CSM for 2017. We are pleased that the CFS Chair, Ambassador Amira Gornass, has kindly accepted to deliver a welcome address at this meeting, which is open to all members and participants of the CFS. The languages of the meeting will be English and Spanish. We would appreciate it if you could accept this invitation and come a join us for the meeting!   Download the Agenda! Download the Flyer!

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HLPE Report Multistakeholder Partnerships

HLPE Report on Multistakeholder Partnerships to Finance and Improve Food Security and Nutrition in the Framework of the 2030 Agenda During its 43rd Plenary Session (17-21 October 2016), the CFS requested the HLPE to produce a report on “Multistakeholder Partnerships to Finance and Improve Food Security and Nutrition in the Framework of the 2030 Agenda” to be presented at CFS45 Plenary session in October 2018. As part of its report elaboration process, the HLPE is launching an e-consultation to seek views and comments on the following scope and building blocks of the report, outlined below, as proposed by the HLPE Steering Committee. Deadline for contributions 31 of January 2017. Proposed draft Scope of the HLPE Report by the HLPE Steering Committee Multistakeholder partnerships (MSPs) combine resources and expertise of different actors, which has made them attractive as a way to address complex issues that cannot easily be solved by a single actor. MSPs are identified in SDG 17 (in particular articles 17.6 and 17.7) as a central tool in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda. They will be key in sharing experiences, technologies, knowledges, and in mobilising domestic and foreign, public and private resources, in line with the Addis Ababa Action Agenda (AAAA) and with the CFS principles for Responsible Investment in Agriculture and Food systems (CFS-RAI). The report shall explore the notion of multistakeholder partnerships related to food security and nutrition, looking at both processes and outcomes. The report shall assess the effectiveness of MSPs in realizing their objectives, in financing and improving FSN outcomes, as well as their contribution to the governance of food systems. The report shall suggest methods to map the different categories of MSPs, and criteria to assess them against the objective of improving their contribution to FSN in the framework of the 2030 Agenda. The report shall address the following questions: Who are the stakeholders in food security and nutrition? What are the interests and motivations of each stakeholder? How to attract and retain partners? What are their various levels of responsibility? How to define “multistakeholder partnership” for food security and nutrition? What are the existing types of partnerships for financing and improving food security and nutrition? What are the tensions between the nature of these stakeholders and the functions of the partnerships? What are the goals, effectiveness, impact and performance of various forms of MSPs in reaching FSN objectives, in the context of the 2030 Agenda? What criteria,

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HLPE Steering Committee’s Renewal – Extension of deadline!

The deadline of the call for nominations has been extended until the 14th of February! The Steering Committee of the High Level Panel of Experts (HLPE) of the Committee on World Food Security (CFS) is to be renewed in 2017, for a 2-year term starting at the closure of CFS44 (13 October 2017) and ending at closure of CFS46 (2019). A call for nominations is therefore open until January 31st. Nominations can be made by the CSM collectively and also by individual civil society organisations. The suggestion is to collect proposals for nominations by the CSM, by using the Criteria you will find at this link for selecting nominations of the CSM for the HLPE Steering Committee. They include the formal criteria established by the HLPE itself and additional criteria for candidates to be proposed by the CSM. The official deadline for nominations is 31 January 2017; for the internal collection of nominations, we would suggest as deadline 20 January. For any further information please write to the CSM Secretariat cso4cfs@gmail.com

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Nutrition and Food Systems. HLPE Consultation on the zero Draft

Communication from the HLPE Project Team and Steering Committee Read the Zero Draft of the HLPE Report on Nutrition and Food Systems To join the CSM Working Group on Nutrition write an email to cso4cfs@gmail.com   Deadline for inputs 5 December 2016 At its 42nd session in October 2015, the UN Committee on World Food Security (CFS) requested the High Level Panel of Experts on Food Security and Nutrition (HLPE) to prepare a report on Nutrition and Food Systems. This report is expected to be presented at CFS 44 in October 2017. As part of the process of elaboration of its reports, the HLPE is organizing a consultation to seek inputs, suggestions, and comments on the present V0 draft. This open e-consultation will be used by the HLPE to further elaborate the report, which will then be submitted to external expert review, before finalization and approval by the HLPE Steering Committee. HLPE V0 drafts are deliberately presented early enough in the process – as a work-in-progress, with their range of imperfections – to allow sufficient time to give proper consideration to the feedback received so that it can play a really useful role in the elaboration of the report. It is a key part of the scientific dialogue between the HLPE Project Team and Steering Committee, and the rest of the knowledge community. It should be noted that the present V0 draft report does not yet identify areas for recommendations as it is too early to determine the major propositions stemming from the report. It should be noted that there are several reports that have just been released or will be released over the coming year including the Foresight Report on the Future of Diets (September 2016) and the EAT-Lancet Commission on Sustainable Diets and Food Systems (June 2017). The Project Team members will ensure that these reports will be kept in due consideration. In order to strengthen this draft, the HLPE would welcome submission of material, evidence-based suggestions, references, and examples, in particular addressing the following important questions: The purpose of this report is to analyse the ways in which food systems influence dietary patterns and hence nutritional outcomes. The objective is to focus on consumers and consider sustainability issues. The report aims to be solution oriented and to highlight efficient policies and programs. Are those major objective(s) clearly reflected in the V0 draft? Do you think that the

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CSM Final Statement @CFS 43

CSM Final Statement to CFS 43 – 21 October 2016 The CFS has become a unique space in the United Nations System where the voices of small-scale food producers, family farmers, fisher folks, indigenous peoples, food and agricultural workers, pastoralists, landless, women, youth, consumers, the urban food insecure and NGOs have been able to actively participate through an autonomous and open space, the CSM. The CSM has become the largest global space of civil society organizations working on food security and nutrition. Its participating organizations from 11 global constituencies and 17 sub-regions represent far beyond 380 Million food producers and consumers, and particularly the largest organizations and platforms of family farmers and smallholders worldwide. The CSM welcomes and appreciates most of the outcomes and proceedings of CFS 43, particularly the policy recommendations on Smallholder to Markets, Sustainable Agricultural Development and Livestock, and the activities and decisions related to Monitoring, Nutrition and SDGs. These decisions are of particular importance for smallholders and other constituencies and need to be disseminated, used and applied. The CSM congratulates the CFS Chair for conducting the Session in a fair, inclusive and participative way. The CSM suggests that the upcoming CFS Bureau and Advisory Group meeting in November evaluates the CFS 43 and its proceedings, including the initial confusion about the different roles of participants and observers. Another pressing issue is also how to include urgent, relevant and sometime controversial issues into the debate of a CFS Session, to give the CFS visibility and relevance on these issues of worldwide attention. The CFS is at the crossroads: We have seen during the past two years and also during this session, that there are two possible pathways for the CFS: either it goes in the direction of erosion of the CFS Reform, or in the direction of strengthening the CFS in the spirit of its Reform. The eight actions here are: Affirming the Vision of the CFS: the CFS is committed to contribute to the progressive realization of the right to adequate food. The centrality of human rights, particularly the indivisibility, universality, interdependency and interrelatedness of all human rights are fundamental for the CFS. There is no way to comply with the right to food without respecting, protecting and fulfilling women’s rights. Preserving the Focus of the CFS. Everybody is invited to contribute to the CFS. But special attention is given to the organizations of smallholders and

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CSM Plenary Statements @CFS43!

In this section you will be able to find the Civil Society Organisations’ Plenary Statements at CFS 43  Monday 17 October 2016 Opening Statement on Sustainable Food Systems, Nutrition and Climate Change On CFS Policy Convergence: Discussion on Sustainable Agricultural Development for Food Security and Nutrition including the role of Livestock: First Intervention Second Intervention Third Intervention  Fourth Intervention  Tuesday 18 October 2016 CFS Engagement in Advancing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: First and Second Intervention State of Food Insecurity in the World and the 2030 Agenda (no text available) Policy Convergence: Connecting Smallholders to Markets: Policy Recommendations: Main Messages of the first three interventions Additional intervention (Only available in Spanish) Monitoring the Implementation of CFS decisions and recommendations: Terms of Reference for Sharing Experiences and Good Practices (Only available in Spanish) Wednesday 19 October 2016 Monitoring the Implementation of CFS decisions and recommendations: Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure Global Thematic Event: CSM Panel intervention – Presentation of the CSO Independent Report on Civil Society experiences regarding the use and implementation of the tenure guidelines and the challenge of monitoring CFS decisions First Intervention Second Intervention (Only available in Spanish) Third Intervention CFS Engagement in Advancing Nutrition: First Intervention (Only available in Spanish) Second Intervention Multi‐Year Programme of Work Thursday 20 October 2016 Forum on Urbanisation, Rural Transformation and Implications for Food Security and Nutrition: CSM Intervention Global Strategic Framework for Food Security and Nutrition: CSM Intervention Friday 21 October 2016 CFS Special Event: From Agreement to Action Towards Implementing the 2030 Agenda: Learning from the First Volunteer National Reviews: CSM Intervention from the panel (Only available in Spanish) Evaluation of the CFS:  CSM Intervention Adoption of the final Report: CSM Final Statement       

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CSM Opening Statement at CFS 43!

Opening Statement of Civil Society Mechanism – 17 October 2016 CFS 43 Opening: Sustainable Food Systems, Nutrition and Climate Change CSM welcomes the attention being given at World Food Day to the links between climate change, agriculture and food security. To be sure, we, small scale food providers, farmers, pastoralists, fishers, indigenous peoples, food and agricultural workers, youth and women live in the places where climate change is felt most acutely, in the most fragile ecosystems, and under the most difficult working conditions. We nurture and grow biodiversity in our fields, forests, waters, mountains and deserts, where the greatest biodiversity is often found. For centuries we have safeguarded precious and diverse seeds and animal breeds — through conservation, sustainable use, breeding, exchange and our intimate knowledge of how they perform in the changing contexts of our ecosystems.  We practice agroecology: a vast body of knowledge, practices, and ways of knowing and working with our agro-ecosystems.  Agroecology is our systems approach to climate adaptation and mitigation. The industrial food system, particularly industrial agriculture and livestock sectors, contributes more than one third of total global greenhouse gas emissions. Droughts and floods create food price volatility, which deepen hunger, malnutrition and vulnerability. In contrast, small-scale food producers and workers provide majority of the world’s food, with less fossil energy and waste, with more carbon sequestration capacity, on a quarter of the world’s farmland. We are alarmed that instead of recognizing and supporting the potential of agroecology and ending corporate control over food and agriculture, false solutions to climate change are being proposed that do not address its root causes, but instead promote practices and conditions that exacerbate climate change. These include climate smart agriculture, emissions trading and offset schemes, blue carbon, and various market mechanisms that are kicking people off the land, grabbing water and oceans, expanding monocultures, and financialising our food systems. We also raise cautions against solutions that involve technical fixes, or marginalize our knowledge and our control over our ecosystems, under the name of ‘climate smart agriculture’. Corporate mergers are also taking place in the name of better fighting climate change. If we want to build climate resilience, we must protect and respect our rights to territories, forests, water, seeds, knowledge and the rights of workers. At the same time we must stop the practices and policies that are destroying our ecosystems with industrial agriculture and aquaculture, monocultures, extractive industry and mega

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CSM Side Events at CFS 43

CSM Side events proposals for CFS 43 were approved! Tuesday 18 of October 2016 18.00-19.30 Red Room Building A Flr 1 (Languages: EN/ES/FR) Contributing to the CFS Monitoring Mechanism. Experiences with the use of the VGGT, and the challenge for monitoring other CFS decisions (CSM Working Group on Monitoring) Download the Flyer! Speakers: Serge Tomasi – Ambassador of France Sofia Monsalve – FIAN Heather Elaydi – The Arab Group for the Protection of Nature Marcela Villarreal – FAO Rosana Miranda – Special Department of Family Farming and Agrarian Development, Brazil Wednesday 19 of October 2016  13.00-14.30 Lebanon Room Building C Flr 2 (Languages: EN/ES/FR) Livestock, Livelihoods and Food Security: Civil society responses to pressing equity, ecological and public health crises. Dialogue on agroecological proposals by peasant and agro-silvo-pastoral communities and other civil society’s perspectives on how to address multiple, complex and intertwined challenges (CSM Working Group on Sustainable Agricultural Development including the role of livestock) Download the Flyer! Speakers: Maria Teresa Alvarez, World Alliance of Mobile Indigenous People (WAMIP) Papis Bakary Colis, La Via Campesina (LVC) Dirk Jan Verdonk, World Animal Protection Dennis Olson, IUF/UFCW With the participation of: Amb. Yaya Olaniran, Permanent Representative of Nigeria to FAO, IFAD and WFP Damien Kelly, Permanent Mission of Ireland to FAO, IFAD and WFP Bettina Prato, IFAD Moderator: Stefano Prato, Society for International Development (SID) Thursday 20 of October 2016 8.30-10.00 Philippines Room Building C Flr 2 (Languages: EN/ES/FR) Contributing to the future priorities of the CFS. Dialogue on common pathways to address Agroecology and Genetic Resources (CSM Participating organisations) Download the Flyer! Introduction of the panel and moderation: Carl Hutchby – International Indian Treaty Council (IITC) Civil Society Proposals: Antonio Gonzalez – Movimiento Agroecológico de Latino America y el Caribe (MAELA) Chantal Jacovetti – La Via Campesina (LVC) Comments  by: Dr. Gunnvor Berge – Responsible for CFS at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Norway Larissa Maria Lima Costa – Alternate Permanent Representative of Brazil to FAO, WFO and IFAD Jimena Gómez – AGP FAO Thursday 20 of October 2016 18.00-19.30 Iraq Room  Building A/B Flr 2 (Languages: EN/ES/FR) Conflicts of Interest in Food security and Nutrition Policies: Which way forward for the CFS? Background and policy options to respect, protect and fulfil human rights and safeguard public policy spaces on food security and nutrition against undue influence (CSM Working Group on Nutrition) Download the Flyer! Speakers: Jonathan H. Marks, Associate Professor of Bioethics, Humanities and Law, Penn

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Connecting Smallholders to Markets: an analytical guide

Connecting Smallholders to Markets’ is the title of policy recommendations negotiated on 8- 9 June 2016 in the Committee on World Food Security, the foremost inclusive international and intergovernmental platform deliberating on is- sues of food security and nutrition. Work on this extremely important topic has been underway since 2014. It has involved multiple rounds of for- mal and informal consultations, including most notably a High-Level Forum held in June 2015. The process has provided a welcome occasion for CFS members and participants to debate the issues and concepts involved, on which quite different understandings have been expressed. This work is far-reaching, and touches not only on specific topics such as food safety standards but also questions as fundamental as ‘What is a market?’, ‘In what kinds of markets are small- scale producers actually present?’ ‘Which mar- kets now channel most of the food consumed in the world?’ ‘What would constitute a positive way forward for relations between small-scale producers, markets and food security, and what investment and public policies would be needed to promote this?’. Read the Guide! This analytical guide examines how small- scale food producers’ organisations and allied civil society can use the recommen- dations in their national and international advocacy and how they can work together with their governments to apply them in the context of national and regional policies and programmes. It argues that the policy rec- ommendations illuminate the relationships of smallholders to markets in two main ways: i) they recognize that the bulk of food is chan- nelled through markets linked to local, na- tional and regional food systems (‘territorial markets’), thereby clearly positioning these markets as foremost amongst different kinds of market systems in the context of food se- curity and nutrition; ii) they urge governments to employ public policy to support of these territorial markets, both by strengthening ter- ritorial markets where they already exist and by opening up new spaces for these markets to take root and flourish. With such an ap- proach, smallholders would be well equipped to meet global challenges ahead.

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