Towards Smallholder-oriented Public Policies. Independent Report by CSM

Towards Smallholder-oriented Public Policies:   Independent report by the Civil Society and Indigenous  Peoples Mechanism for the Committee on World Food Security monitoring the use and implementation of CFS  policy recommendations on smallholders – 2019 DOWNLOAD THE REPORT HERE! Small-scale producers or smallholders feed the large majority of the world’s population, yet their importance has only recently been recognized in global policy spaces. The UN Committee on World Food Security (CFS) has been a key player in this, challenging the dominant narrative that the only solution to food insecurity is calling on technology to produce more food and agribusiness value chains to process it and channel it to consumers. Since its reform in 2009, the CFS has recognized both the agency of small-producers as well as the key roles they play in right to food realization and in achieving food security and nutrition. Through policy convergence processes, it has worked towards supporting smallholders in these roles. This policy focus is a direct result of the participation and evidence of small-scale producers from around the globe in CFS policy processes.  This year the CFS is placing smallholders at center stage, monitoring the use and application of three CFS policy recommendations: Investing in Smallholder Agriculture for Food Security and nutrition (CFS 40, 2013), Connecting Smallholders to Markets (CFS 43, 2016) and Sustainable Agriculture Development for Food Security and Nutrition: What Roles for Livestock? (CFS 43, 2016). This report is the contribution of the Civil Society and Indigenous Peoples Mechanism (CSM) to that process. Following a human rights-based approach on monitoring and based on exchanges with actors from around the globe, this report takes the reality on the ground as the basis of analysis to assess not only how the policy recommendations have been used at the national level, regional and global level, but also where their potential is and further work is needed.  The report begins by highlighting the progress made in the use and application of the CFS smallholder policy recommendations. The recommendations have helped to shape the content of other UN policy initiatives and legal instruments, including the UN Decade of Family Farming and UN Declaration on the Rights of Peasants and Other People Working in Rural Areas. Also within the CFS, these policy processes have contributed to a common understanding and language on the importance of respecting, protecting and fulfilling women’s rights in the context of food security and nutrition. Civil society

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CSM Paper on Feminism and Agroecology!

An input and vision paper of the CSM Working Group of Women Without feminism there is no agroecology! Towards healthy, sustainable and just food systems August 2019   This document intends to inform CSM positions towards the  upcoming CFS Policy Process on Agroecology and other innovations. A shorter version of this vision is also included in the new edition 2019 of the Right to Food and Nutrition Watch of the Global Network for the Right to Food and Nutrition  This text is the outcome of an incredible collective work and was adopted by the CSM Women Working Group that counts with 190 participating organisations in August 2019. It wouldn’t have been possible without the commitment and engagement of many special women. DOWNLOAD AND READ THE PAPER HERE!

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CSM Annual Report 2017/2018

CSM Annual Report 2017//2018 Download the Full Report here! The period 2017/2018 was a quite intense year for the CSM. This Annual Report provides an overview on the CSM engagement with all CFS Policy Processes during the period September 2017- October 2018 and shares a summary of key political messages towards CFS 45. As in previous years, the report also comprises an overview of CSM on the use, application and monitoring of CFS policy outcomes, and a summary of the Coordination Committee (CC) discussions and decisions in the reporting period. It concludes with the financial picture for 2017/18 and an outlook for 2019. This report was submitted for consideration of the CSM Coordination Committee meeting and the CSM Forum in October 2018, as part of the reporting and accountability procedures in the CSM. The report was revised and updated after these CSM meetings and the CFS 45. There are many elements that would be worthwhile highlighting in this introduction. Here, it might be good to choose just one of them: the CSM Coordination Committee discussed and agreed at its meeting in July 2018 on a name amendment to the CSM, as it was suggested by the Indigenous Peoples’ constituency in September 2017. The name’s amendment was unanimously ratified by the CSM Coordination Committee during its meeting in October and shared with and welcomed by the CSM Forum through a very inspiring and collective ceremony of celebration. The full name of the CSM is from now on: “Civil Society and Indigenous Peoples’ Mechanism (CSM) for relations with the UN Committee on World Food Security (CFS)”.It was an important exercise for the CSM Coordination Committee to come to this amendment by consensus, as it involved a deep exchange, increased mutual understanding and full acknowledgment of the long-standing and ongoing struggles of indigenous peoples for being recognized in their identities as indigenous peoples.

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CSM Women’s Vision!

CSM Women’s Vision Document 2018 We women of the CSM constituency, gathering rural and urban, fisher folks, peasants, pastoralists, indigenous, consumers, agricultural workers, NGO activists, landless women from all across the world, met during the CFS High Level Forum on women’s empowerment in the context of food security and nutrition, and developed the structure of our Vision Statement.  This vision has been adopted by the CSM Women Constituency and aims to guide and promote the actions of the CSM within and outside the CFS to achieve the right to food for all women. We believe that the right to food, food security and nutrition and food sovereignty of women will never be achieved without ensuring the full respect, protection and fulfilment of women’s rights. We want to go beyond the universally agreed goal of gender equality and women’s empowerment, which does not explicitly assert the centrality of women’s rights. We also express some concern about the term “empowerment”, which might imply a top-down relation where women are conceived as recipients of external education, training, and interventions. We want to support our self-determination, autonomy and decision-making power in all the aspects of our lives, including the food we produce and consume. We recognize the need to deconstruct the dominant narrative on women who are very often portrayed as victims in need of anti-poverty policies and social assistance, and treated as objects in the food advertising and marketing industry. All actors engaged in the CFS must internalize in their analysis, contributions and practical actions the fact that women are active political subjects, agents of their own change and development, and must be recognized as having the right to self-determine themselves and their bodies. Women are knowledge bearers and have capacities, we require public policies that are gender-oriented or specific for women, with adequate budgets to guarantee their effective implementation. They should be primarily directed to women’s organizations, promoting self-empowerment, self-training and women’s autonomy.  This perspective should inform any discussion leading to CFS policy decisions as these can be conducive to change or perpetuate the violence against women by hierarchical and discriminatory power that is historically and socially constructed, and normalized. We believe that the current global food system builds on and perpetuates gender based discrimination and the violation of women’s rights. In order to achieve a fair and equal society where women can fully enjoy their rights, we must put at the

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Civil Society Report on the use and implementation of the Right to Food Guidelines

Independent Civil Society Report on the use and implementation of the Right to Food Guidelines Download the full Report here!   The CFS’ monitoring of the use and application of the RTF Guidelines  comes at an important moment. The protection, promotion and realization of human rights – including the right to food – is now at a critical juncture. Human rights spaces are under threat with the rise of authoritarian governments, xenophobic and nationalistic forces, and the trend towards declining authority of public sector policy-making to the benefit of private sector entities and interests. The CFS, too, is experiencing resistance to its human rights mandate. References to the right to food and human rights in the context of the CFS’ normative work are consistently challenged by some states. The CFS rules and practices that underlie its legitimacy by privileging the voice of those most affected by the policies under discussion are in danger of being eroded. Avowed concern for efficiency  and cost-control, risk de-politicizing the CFS’ work and weakening its impact. Compounding the political struggles, for the first time  in a decade, the number of food insecure has increased – with rates moving from 784 million in 2015 to an alarming 821 million in 2017. Mainstream reports cite the increasing number of conflicts and climate-shocks as the  main driver of rising levels of hunger and malnutrition, together with growing rates of unemployment and the deterioration of social protection nets. However, this analysis fails to also fully address the root causes of hunger and malnutrition linked to gender, race, class, and access to resources, as well as the increasing influence of corporations at all levels, including in food production and consumption habits, pricing, and marketing. It has never been so important to reflect on the space and significance of human rights and the right to food. Monitoring in the context of the CFS provides an opportunity to consider how the normative understanding of the right to food has advanced since the adoption of the RTF Guidelines , to document success in right to food implementation and to critically assess where (and why) violations of the right to food persist. It also provides an opportunity to establish spaces of accountability, to give voice to those most affected by violations of the right to food and nutrition, and to plan for the future. .

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CSM Evaluation and Facilitation

CSM Facilitation 2019 – 2020   The findings of the CSM Evaluation of 2018 have been deeply discussed by the Coordination Committee and the CSM Forum 2018. Many of the findings generated new path and lines of works. As part of this follow-up work an internal Working Group on Facilitation was established with two main objectives: a) the drafting of a common understanding on Facilitation and the b) the drafting of a list of tasks for CSM Sub-regional and Constituency Coordination Committee members. Common understanding of Facilitation, as adopted by the Coordination Committee (CC) in January 2020. List of tasks for CSM Sub-regional and Constituency Coordination Committee members as adopted by the CC in January 2020. ———————————————————————————————————- CSM Evaluation 2018 The independent evaluation of the CSM conducted by Priscilla Claeys and Jessica Duncan it’s concluded and the full report is finally available  at this link. Please find below the Terms of Reference and background process that informed the process throughout 2017//2018. The CSM Evaluation findings and recommendations were discussed during the Coordination Committee meeting of October 2018 and during the CSM Forum on 13-14 October 2018. Also find at this link a discussion paper on Facilitation prepared for the CSM by Josh Brem-Wilson from the Centre for Agroecology and Resilience of Coventry University (UK) in September 2018, that complements the work of the CSM Evaluation. Terms of Reference of CSM Evaluation  Background and process: As foreseen in the CSM founding document, a first evaluation of the CSM was conducted in 2013/2014, and its results were discussed by the CC in July 2014. See the full report here. The exercise was found very useful for the development of the Mechanism, and therefore, a second evaluation was scheduled for 2017/18. The CC meeting in May 2017 had a first discussion on the scope and topics of the evaluation, and the CC meeting in October 2017 agreed on a concept note for its further implementation between December 2017 and March 2018. Objective of the Evaluation: The evaluation is carried out with the aim of assessing how the CSM is functioning in line with its founding document, guiding principles and mandate and functions. The Evaluation will assess CSM’s strengths and weaknesses, challenges and potentials with regard to three areas: the internal dimension, the external dimension, and “visionary” dimension, as outlined in detail in the section on the scope. The evaluation will particularly look at the last three

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CSM Annual Report 2016/2017

CSM Annual Report 2016//2017 The period 2016/2017 was a quite intense year for the CSM. This Annual Report gives an overview on the CSM engagement with all CFS Policy Processes and provides a political analysis of key debates in this period. The report also comprises a summary of Coordination Committee (CC) activities, the nancial report and an outlook for 2018. In October 2017, the CSM CC and the CSM Forum considered and discussed a draft version of this Annual Report which was then revised and updated, and is now shared publicly with the participating organiza- tions of the CSM and all interested members and participants to the CFS. The report demonstrates that the CSM is a dynamic and always evolving space where global, continental and national organisations of social movements, civil society and indigenous peoples commit to jointly contribute to the realization of CFS’s vision to strive for a world without hunger and to advance the progressive realization of the right to adequate food. The CSM is an essential and autonomous part of the Committee on World Food Security (CFS). The report shows how participating organizations to the CSM put into practice the mandate of this Mechanism: facilitating the participation and e ective contributions of all its constituencies – Smallholder and Family Farmers, Fisherfolks, Pastoralists, Indigenous Peoples, Food and Agricultural Workers, Landless, Women, Youth, Consumers, Urban Food Insecure, and NGOs – to the deliberations of the CFS. The new CSM Coordination Committee elected for October 2017- October 2019 took over from the previous CC before this year’s CFS Plenary. We would like to express again the collective and deep gratitude to the out- going CC members for their extraordinary commitment, energy and contributions in facilitating and guiding the Mechanism during the past two years! We were very sad when we heard that our dear friend and CC member Kuria Gathuru passed away on No- vember 15, 2017. Over the past three years, Kuria had been an integral part of our CSM family, serving as a co-facilitator of the global constituency of the Urban Food Insecure to the CSM CC and Co-Coordinator of the Urbanization and Rural Transformation Working Group. We always deeply appreciated Kuria and his way of being with all of us, enriching our space and work with his wonderful personality, knowledge and commitment. We are very grateful for the time and wisdom he dedicated to the CSM, bringing

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CSM Welcome Kit

CSM Welcome Kit: Useful Tips on the Civil Society Mechanism (CSM) for Relations with the UN Committee on World Food Security (CFS)   Understanding the role and structure of the CFS is no easy task! It results that understanding what the CSM is and does, proves to be quite complex too.   This welcome kit wants to be an accessible tool to start navigating these complex spaces. It can be useful for those who approach the CSM and CFS for the first time, but they can also be a useful set of tips to get back to for more experienced participants.   Please DOWNLOAD THE KIT HERE and share it widely among your constituencies and sub-regions so that the CSM and the CFS may become less abstract spaces for those who carry out the struggle at the local level.   Do you want to know more? Check out the CSM page for a more detailed explanation and download the the power point presentation of the CSM    

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The CSM Annual Report 2015-2016 is now online!

CSM Annual Report 2015-2016 This Annual Report documents the work of the CSM during the period August 2015 to August 2016, and aims to be an essential tool for the internal and external communication and accountability process. The Report 2015-2016 consists of the following parts: • Summary of CSM engagement with the CFS (2015-2016) • A civil society view on the CFS, 7 years after its reform • Reporting and Follow-Up to CFS 42 • Civil Society contributions to CFS Processes in 2016 (towards CFS 43) • Operational information on the CSM during the reporting period In October 2016, the CSM Coordination Committee and the CSM Forum considered the draft Annual Report that was then later revised and is now being published. The report shows the substantial collective work carried out by a huge number of global, regional and national social movements and civil society organizations who achieve, through participatory deliberation processes, to formulate and defend joint positions towards all complex policy processes in the CFS. Read the CSM Annual Report 2015-2016

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Connecting Smallholders to Markets: an analytical guide

Connecting Smallholders to Markets’ is the title of policy recommendations negotiated on 8- 9 June 2016 in the Committee on World Food Security, the foremost inclusive international and intergovernmental platform deliberating on is- sues of food security and nutrition. Work on this extremely important topic has been underway since 2014. It has involved multiple rounds of for- mal and informal consultations, including most notably a High-Level Forum held in June 2015. The process has provided a welcome occasion for CFS members and participants to debate the issues and concepts involved, on which quite different understandings have been expressed. This work is far-reaching, and touches not only on specific topics such as food safety standards but also questions as fundamental as ‘What is a market?’, ‘In what kinds of markets are small- scale producers actually present?’ ‘Which mar- kets now channel most of the food consumed in the world?’ ‘What would constitute a positive way forward for relations between small-scale producers, markets and food security, and what investment and public policies would be needed to promote this?’. Read the Guide! This analytical guide examines how small- scale food producers’ organisations and allied civil society can use the recommen- dations in their national and international advocacy and how they can work together with their governments to apply them in the context of national and regional policies and programmes. It argues that the policy rec- ommendations illuminate the relationships of smallholders to markets in two main ways: i) they recognize that the bulk of food is chan- nelled through markets linked to local, na- tional and regional food systems (‘territorial markets’), thereby clearly positioning these markets as foremost amongst different kinds of market systems in the context of food se- curity and nutrition; ii) they urge governments to employ public policy to support of these territorial markets, both by strengthening ter- ritorial markets where they already exist and by opening up new spaces for these markets to take root and flourish. With such an ap- proach, smallholders would be well equipped to meet global challenges ahead.

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Civil Society Report on the use and implementation of the Tenure Guidelines

The Synthesis Report on Civil Society experiences regarding the use and implementation of the Tenure Guidelines and the challenge of monitoring CFS decisions is now ready! A Contribution of the Civil Society to the Global Thematic Event during the 43rd Session of the Committee on World Food Security (CFS) and to developing an innovative mechanism for the monitoring  of CFS decisions and recommendations. This synthesis report summarizes the results of a broad consultation among small-scale food producers and other civil society organizations (CSOs) around the globe on the use and implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries and Forests (henceforth “the Guidelines”). Read the Report here! Read the Annex: List of CSOs’ experiences regarding use and implementation of the Tenure Guidelines submitted for the elaboration of the synthesis report Small-scale food producers rely on access to and control over natural resources such as land, including farmland, forests, grazing land and fishing grounds, for the realization of their human right to food and nutrition, their survival and livelihoods. However, a huge number of them face obstacles and threats to this access and control over natural resources. In many countries, land and resource grabbing and the privatization of nature (including in the context of large-scale agricultural land acquisitions and large-scale development and investment projects) result in forced evictions, mass displacement, food insecurity and human rights abuses and violations. In this context, the Guidelines are an unprecedented international agreement and provide practical guidance to improve governance of tenure of land, fisheries and forests based on human rights, with an emphasis on vulnerable and marginalized people. Since their unanimous approval by the CFS member states in 2012, various actors have engaged in a broad range of activities around the world in order to promote and ensure their implementation. Monitoring the use and application of the Guidelines as well as their contribution to the improvement of tenure governance is an important part of their implementation.

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